Welcome to our Database

A free resource that provides a single source of authoritative information on Gaelic forms of place-names. You will find tips on searching the database here.

Search our database!


Match phrase Match words

Our Products

Become a corporate member, hire us or check our publications.

Browse our shop

Support Us

Do you like what we do? Support the Growth of our database by making a donation to place-name research.

Support our research

Latest Post

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Dornoch ~ Dòrnach, ‘pebble-place’ https://ainmean-aite.scot/en/placename-2/…
#AinmÀite #Gàidhlig #Cleachdi Bòrd na Gàidhlig The Highland Council
... See MoreSee Less

Dornoch ~ Dòrnach, ‘pebble-place’ https://www.ainmean-aite.scot/en/placename-2/?id=7101
#AinmÀite #Gàidhlig #Cleachdi Bòrd na Gàidhlig The Highland Council

Dumfries ~ Dùn Phris, ‘copse-fort’
#AinmÀite #Gàidhlig #Cleachdi Bòrd na Gàidhlig Dumfries and Galloway Council
... See MoreSee Less

Dumfries ~ Dùn Phris, ‘copse-fort’ https://www.ainmean-aite.scot/placename/dumfries/
#AinmÀite #Gàidhlig #Cleachdi Bòrd na Gàidhlig Dumfries and Galloway Council

Comment on Facebook Dumfries ~ Dùn ...

Hm - not quite that clear-cut. The medieval records vary between Dun- and Drum-, both names, 'fort' and 'ridge', could have been current. And in either case, a Brittonic *dīn/ drum-prēs could be in the background, adopted by Gaelic speakers. Brittonic (and early Gaelic) prēs would be 'brushwood, scrub, thicket' rather than 'copse'; Gaelic preas is pretty surely a loanword from Brittonic/ Pictish.

Latest News